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LEADER 00000nam  2200541 i 4500 
005    20180628162307.0 
006    m     o  d         
007    cr un ---uuuuu 
008    150303s2015    nyua    o     001 0 eng d 
020    9781101606988 :|c$51.00 
020    1101606983 :|c$51.00 
035    (OCoLC)883300594|z(OCoLC)906006522|z(OCoLC)913784392
       |z(OCoLC)919336168 
037    0014573455|bBaker & Taylor 
040    NjBwBT|beng|erda|cNjBwBT|dUtOrBLW 
043    n-us--- 
069    02416097 
082 04 338.7/688724 
082 04 338.7/688724|223 
100 1  Bissonnette, Zac,|eauthor. 
245 14 The great beanie baby bubble :|bmass delusion and the dark
       side of cute /|cZac Bissonnette.|h[Axis 360 electronic 
       resource] 
264  1 New York, New York :|bPortfolio/Penguin,|c2015. 
300    1 online resource (260 pages) :|billustrations (some 
       color) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
347    text file|2rda 
500    Includes index. 
520    A bestselling journalist delivers the never-before-told 
       story of the plush animal craze that became the tulip 
       mania of the 1990s In the annals of consumer crazes, 
       nothing compares to Beanie Babies. In just three years, 
       collectors who saw the toys as a means of speculation made
       creator Ty Warner, an eccentric college dropout, a 
       billionaire'without advertising or big-box distribution. 
       Beanie Babies were ten percent of eBay's sales in its 
       early days, with an average selling price of $30'six times
       the retail price. At the peak of the bubble in 1999, 
       Warner reported a personal income of $662 million'more 
       than Hasbro and Mattel combined. The end of the craze was 
       swift and devastating, with 'rare' Beanie Babies deemed 
       worthless as quickly as they'd once been deemed priceless.
       Bissonnette draws on hundreds of interviews (including a 
       visit to a man who lives with his 40,000 Ty products and 
       an in-prison interview with a guy who killed a coworker 
       over a Beanie Baby debt) for the first book on the 
       strangest speculative mania of all time. 
520    Traces the Beanie Babies consumer craze of the 1990s, 
       drawing on hundreds of interviews to document the line's 
       spectacular rise and fall. 
520    " A bestselling journalist delivers the never-before-told 
       story of the plush animal craze that became the tulip 
       mania of the 1990s . In the annals of consumer crazes, 
       nothing compares to Beanie Babies. In just three years, 
       collectors who saw the toys as a means of speculation made
       creator Ty Warner, an eccentric college dropout, a 
       billionaire-without advertising or big-box distribution. 
       Beanie Babies were ten percent of eBay's sales in its 
       early days, with an average selling price of $30-six times
       the retail price. At the peak of the bubble in 1999, 
       Warner reported a personal income of $662 million-more 
       than Hasbro and Mattel combined.  The end of the craze was
       swift and devastating, with "rare" Beanie Babies deemed 
       worthless as quickly as they'd once been deemed priceless.
       Bissonnette draws on hundreds of interviews (including a 
       visit to a man who lives with his 40,000 Ty products and 
       an in-prison interview with a guy who killed a coworker 
       over a Beanie Baby debt) for the first book on the 
       strangest speculative mania of all time. "--|cProvided by 
       publisher. 
520    "In the annals of consumer crazes, nothing compares to 
       Beanie Babies. In just three years, collectors who saw the
       toys as a means of speculation made creator Ty Warner, an 
       eccentric college dropout, a billionaire--without 
       advertising or big-box distribution. Beanie Babies were 
       ten percent of eBay's sales in its early days, with an 
       average selling price of $30--six times the retail price. 
       At the peak of the bubble in 1999, Warner reported a 
       personal income of $662 million--more than Hasbro and 
       Mattel combined. The end of the craze was swift and 
       devastating, with "rare" Beanie Babies deemed worthless as
       quickly as they'd once been deemed priceless. Bissonnette 
       draws on hundreds of interviews (including a visit to a 
       man who lives with his 40,000 Ty products and an in-prison
       interview with a guy who killed a coworker over a Beanie 
       Baby debt) for the first book on the strangest speculative
       mania of all time"--|cProvided by publisher. 
588    Description based on print version record. 
600 10 Warner, Ty,|d1944- 
610 20 Ty, Inc.|xHistory. 
650  0 Beanie Babies (Trademark)|xCollectors and collecting
       |xHistory. 
650  0 Toy industry|zUnited States|xHistory. 
650  0 Business. 
650  7 Business.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst00842262 
655  4 Electronic books. 
776 08 |iElectronic reproduction of (manifestation):|aBissonnette,
       Zac.|tGreat Beanie Baby bubble|dNew York, New York : 
       Portfolio/Penguin, 2015|z9781591846024|w(DLC)  2014038639
       |w(OCoLC)889886788 
856 4  |uhttp://ereadil.axis360.baker-taylor.com/
       Title?itemid=0014573455