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LEADER 00000nam  2200745 i 4500 
005    20180628162805.0 
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008    160324s2016    nyu     ob    000 0aeng d 
020    9781101907306 :|c$42.00 
020    1101907304 :|c$42.00 
035    (OCoLC)944242295 
037    0017645060|bBaker & Taylor 
040    NjBwBT|beng|erda|cNjBwBT|dUtOrBLW 
069    09474790 
082 04 305.896/073077434|aB 
082 04 305.896/073077434|aB|223 
100 1  Senghor, Shaka,|eauthor. 
245 10 Writing my wrongs :|blife, death, and redemption in an 
       American prison /|cShaka Senghor.|h[Axis 360 electronic 
       resource] 
250    First revised edition. 
264  1 New York :|bConvergent Books,|c2016. 
300    1 online resource (xi, 268 pages) 
336    text|btxt|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
347    text file|2rda 
504    Includes bibliographical references (pages 267-268). 
520    "In 1991, Shaka Senghor was sent to prison for second-
       degree murder. Today, he is a lecturer at the University 
       of Michigan, a leading voice on criminal justice reform, 
       and an inspiration to thousands. In life, it's not how you
       start that matters. It's how you finish. Shaka Senghor was
       raised in a middle class neighborhood on Detroit's east 
       side during the height of the 1980s crack epidemic. An 
       honor roll student and a natural leader, he dreamed of 
       becoming a doctor--but at age 11, his parents' marriage 
       began to unravel and the beatings from his mother worsened,
       sending him on a downward spiral that saw him run away 
       from home, turn to drug dealing to survive, and end up in 
       prison for murder at the age of 19, fuming with anger and 
       despair. Writing My Wrongs is the story of what came next.
       During his 19-year incarceration, seven of which were 
       spent in solitary confinement, Senghor discovered 
       literature, meditation, and self-examination, tools that 
       he used to confront the demons of his past, forgive the 
       people who hurt him, and begin atoning for the wrongs he 
       had committed. Upon his release at age 38, Senghor became 
       an activist and mentor to young men and women facing 
       circumstances like his. His work in the community and the 
       courage to share his story led him to fellowships at the 
       MIT Media Lab and the Kellogg Foundation and invitations 
       to speak at events like TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. 
       Writing My Wrongs is a redemption story told through a 
       stunningly human portrait of what it's like to grow up in 
       the gravitational pull of poverty, violence, fear, and 
       hopelessness. It's an unforgettable tale of forgiveness 
       and hope, one that reminds us that our worst deeds don't 
       define who we are or what we can contribute to the world. 
       And it's a lasting testament to the power of compassion, 
       prayer, and unconditional love, for reaching those whom 
       society has forgotten"--|cProvided by publisher. 
520    "In 1991, Shaka Senghor was sent to prison for second-
       degree murder. Today, he is a lecturer at the University 
       of Michigan. In life, it's not how you start that matters.
       It's how you finish. Shaka Senghor was raised in a middle 
       class neighborhood on Detroit's eastside during the height
       of the 1980s crack epidemic. An honor roll student and a 
       natural leader, he dreamed of becoming a doctor--but at 
       age 11, his parents' marriage began to unravel and the 
       beatings from his mother worsened, sending him on a 
       downward spiral that saw him run away from home, turn to 
       drug dealing to survive, and end up in prison for murder 
       at the age of 19, fuming with anger and despair. Writing 
       My Wrongs is the story of what came next. During his 19-
       year incarceration, seven of which were spent in solitary 
       confinement, Senghor discovered literature, meditation, 
       and self-examination, tools that he used to confront the 
       demons of his past, forgive the people who hurt him, and 
       begin atoning for the wrongs he had committed. Upon his 
       release at age 38, Senghor became an activist and mentor 
       to young men and women facing circumstances like his. His 
       work in the community and the courage to share his story 
       led him to fellowships at the MIT Media Lab and the 
       Kellogg Foundation and invitations to speak at events like
       TED and the Aspen Ideas Festival. Writing My Wrongs is a 
       redemption story told through a stunningly human portrait 
       of what it's like to grow up in the gravitational pull of 
       poverty, violence, fear, and hopelessness. It's an 
       unforgettable tale of forgiveness and hope, one that 
       reminds us that our worst deeds don't define who we are or
       what we can contribute to the world. And it's a lasting 
       testament to the power of compassion, prayer, and 
       unconditional love"--|cProvided by publisher. 
520    A former prisoner, TED mentor, and criminal justice reform
       advocate traces his coming of age at the height of 
       Detroit's crack epidemic and his nineteen years in prison 
       before he was motivated to help at-risk youth and raise 
       awareness about America's system of mass incarceration. 
588    Description based on print version record. 
600 10 Senghor, Shaka. 
600 10 Senghor, Shaka,|eauthor. 
600 17 Senghor, Shaka.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01987065 
650  0 African American young men|zMichigan|zDetroit|vBiography. 
650  0 Murderers|zMichigan|zDetroit|vBiography. 
650  0 Drug dealers|zMichigan|zDetroit|vBiography. 
650  0 African American prisoners|zMichigan|zDetroit|vBiography. 
650  0 Prisoners|zMichigan|vBiography. 
650  0 Lecturers|zMichigan|vBiography. 
650  0 Criminals|xRehabilitation|zUnited States. 
650  0 Criminal justice, Administration of|zMichigan. 
650  0 Criminal justice, Administration of|zUnited States. 
650  7 Biography & Autobiography.|2overdrive 
650  7 Sociology.|2overdrive 
650  7 Criminal justice, Administration of.|2fast
       |0(OCoLC)fst00883246 
650  7 Criminals|xRehabilitation.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst00883537 
650  7 Lecturers.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst00995279 
650  7 Prisoners.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01077103 
651  0 Detroit (Mich.)|vBiography. 
650 17 Nonfiction.|2overdrive 
651  7 Michigan.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01208387 
651  7 United States.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01204155 
655  4 Electronic books. 
655  7 Autobiographies.|2lcgft 
655  7 Autobiographies.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01919894 
655  7 Biography.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01423686 
776 08 |iElectronic reproduction of (manifestation):|aSenghor, 
       Shaka.|tWriting my wrongs|dNew York : Convergent Books, 
       2016|z9781101907290|w(NjBwBT)bl2016001603
       |w(OCoLC)919682896 
856 4  |uhttp://ereadil.axis360.baker-taylor.com/
       Title?itemid=0017645060