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LEADER 00000nim  2200841 i 4500 
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020    9780735288676 :|c$95.00 
020    0735288674 :|c$95.00 
035    (OCoLC)1005796616 
037    0019537240|bBaker & Taylor 
040    NjBwBT|beng|erda|cNjBwBT|dUtOrBLW 
069    01417167 
082 04 522/.19744409252 
082 04 522/.19744409252|223 
100 1  Sobel, Dava,|eauthor. 
245 14 The glass universe :|bhow the ladies of the Harvard 
       Observatory took the measure of the stars /|cDava Sobel.
       |h[Axis 360 electronic resource] 
250    Unabridged. 
264  1 New York, NY :|bPenguin Audio,|c[2016] 
300    1 online resource (1 audio file) 
306    123000 
336    spoken word|bspw|2rdacontent 
337    computer|bc|2rdamedia 
338    online resource|bcr|2rdacarrier 
344    digital|2rda 
347    audio file|bCD audio|2rda 
500    Downloadable audio file. 
511 0  Read by Cassandra Campbell. 
520    In the mid-nineteenth century, the Harvard College 
       Observatory began employing women as calculators, or 
       "human computers," to interpret the observations their 
       male counterparts made via telescope each night. At the 
       outset this group included the wives, sisters, and 
       daughters of the resident astronomers, but soon the female
       corps included graduates of the new women's 
       colleges?Vassar, Wellesley, and Smith. As photography 
       transformed the practice of astronomy, the ladies turned 
       from computation to studying the stars captured nightly on
       glass photographic plates. The "glass universe" of half a 
       million plates that Harvard amassed over the ensuing 
       decades?through the generous support of Mrs. Anna Palmer 
       Draper, the widow of a pioneer in stellar 
       photography?enabled the women to make extraordinary 
       discoveries that attracted worldwide acclaim. They helped 
       discern what stars were made of, divided the stars into 
       meaningful categories for further research, and found a 
       way to measure distances across space by starlight. Their 
       ranks included Williamina Fleming, a Scottish woman 
       originally hired as a maid who went on to identify ten 
       novae and more than three hundred variable stars; Annie 
       Jump Cannon, who designed a stellar classification system 
       that was adopted by astronomers the world over and is 
       still in use; and Dr. Cecilia Helena Payne, who in 1956 
       became the first ever woman professor of astronomy at 
       Harvard?and Harvard's first female department chair. 
       Elegantly written and enriched by excerpts from letters, 
       diaries, and memoirs, The Glass Universe is the hidden 
       history of the women whose contributions to the burgeoning
       field of astronomy forever changed our understanding of 
       the stars and our place in the universe. 
520    Shares the story of the scientific contributions of a 
       group of women working at the Harvard College Observatory 
       from the late 1800s through the mid-twentieth century, 
       tracing their collection of star observations captured 
       nightly on glass photographic plates. 
538    Requires Axis 360 app. 
588    Description based on original audiobook record. 
600 10 Bailey, Solon I.|q(Solon Irving),|d1854- 
600 10 Cannon, Annie Jump,|d1863-1941. 
600 10 Draper, Mary Anna,|d1839-1914. 
600 10 Fleming, Williamina P.,|d1857-1911. 
600 10 Leavitt, Henrietta Swan,|d1868-1921. 
600 10 Maury, Antonia C.,|d1866-1952. 
600 10 Payne-Gaposchkin, Cecilia,|d1900-1979. 
600 10 Pickering, Edward C.|q(Edward Charles),|d1846-1919. 
600 10 Shapley, Harlow,|d1885-1972. 
600 17 Bailey, Solon I.|q(Solon Irving),|d1854-|2fast
       |0(OCoLC)fst01806271 
600 17 Cannon, Annie Jump,|d1863-1941.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01661459 
600 17 Fleming, Williamina P.,|d1857-1911.|2fast
       |0(OCoLC)fst01957442 
600 17 Leavitt, Henrietta Swan,|d1868-1921.|2fast
       |0(OCoLC)fst01604108 
600 17 Maury, Antonia C.,|d1866-1952.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01959175 
600 17 Payne-Gaposchkin, Cecilia,|d1900-1979.|2fast
       |0(OCoLC)fst00035973 
600 17 Pickering, Edward C.|q(Edward Charles),|d1846-1919.|2fast
       |0(OCoLC)fst00199996 
600 17 Shapley, Harlow,|d1885-1972.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst00007259 
610 20 Harvard College Observatory. 
610 27 Harvard College Observatory.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst00541468 
648  7 1800-1999|2fast 
650  0 Women in astronomy|zMassachusetts|xHistory. 
650  0 Women mathematicians|zMassachusetts|xHistory. 
650  0 Astronomy|xHistory|y19th century. 
650  0 Astronomy|xHistory|y20th century. 
650  7 Astronomy.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst00819673 
650  7 Women in astronomy.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01177831 
650  7 Women mathematicians.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01178130 
651  7 Massachusetts.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01204307 
655  4 Downloadable audio books. 
655  7 Audiobooks.|2lcgft 
655  7 Audiobooks.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01726208 
655  7 History.|2fast|0(OCoLC)fst01411628 
700 1  Campbell, Cassandra,|enarrator. 
776 08 |iElectronic reproduction of (manifestation):|aSobel, 
       Dava.|tGlass universe : how the ladies of the Harvard 
       Observatory took the measure of the stars|dNew York, NY : 
       Penguin Audio, [2016]|z9780735288645|w(NjBwBT)bl2016051154
       |w(OCoLC)945647038 
856 4  |uhttp://ereadil.axis360.baker-taylor.com/
       Title?itemid=0019537240